The last days in Uganda

I am home now, semi-recovered from jet lag (I can, at least, string two coherent thoughts together today, which is a vast improvement from yesterday!). The travel went the best that can be hoped for: long but uneventful. I am back to work (which means I’m a bit panicked!) and hoping to get caught up on everything here in good time. So what happened those last days?

SATURDAY:

Saturday was a fun day, when we hosted a party for the ladies of Nawezakana, the Haven kids, and our sponsored kids. We fed 110 people, and had a lot of laughs as the Haven kids did a great dance set, and other gave speeches. It was hot, but Emily had had the foresight to get a tent, so it was perfect, and we had a great time visiting with everyone. I got to meet 2 of the boys we’ve sponsored through University, Dennis and Boniface, and am so proud of how well they are doing! Our other University student, Festo, is a first year student and we’ve sponsored him for several years. He’s loving his law studies — I told him I’d call him if I ever needed a lawyer there and he could give me a discount. Ha!

Here are some photos:

NESCO, who does our catering. Ten Eighteen help them set up their catering business, and they do a great job!

NESCO, who does our catering. Ten Eighteen help them set up their catering business, and they do a great job!

Waiting in line for yummy food!

Waiting in line for yummy food!

Washing hands

Washing hands

Thank God for the tent!

Thank God for the tent!

delicious lunch!

delicious lunch!

These are our sponsored kids who scored very high on their tests. Racheal, in the yellow, was one of the top in the COUNTRY and was in the paper!

These are our sponsored kids who scored very high on their tests. Racheal, in the yellow, was one of the top in the COUNTRY and was in the paper!

On the way home from the party, in a FULL car, I realized that I had done the last work thing of the trip and immediately felt exhausted! I went to sleep a little after 8pm and woke up just before 7am. Yeah. I was that tired!

SUNDAY:

Sunday was packing day, never fun. Suzanne and I went to town for lunch and to shop at a lady’s house for handmade things like purses and jewelry. She was eccentric but an amazing artist! After dinner, I headed to the airport. The flight was at 11:30pm, to Amsterdam. I arrived there at 5:45am, and had a 4 1/2 hr layover, which is too long! That flight was uneventful, immigration and customs went smoothly, and the flight from Atlanta to Raleigh was on time. I was very, very happy to see my husband and be home, although I’d been awake 45 hours by the time I went to bed at 8pm. Hence the brain malfunction…

So now I’m here, trying to catch up on work as well as follow up with all that I did these past 2 weeks. I so appreciate your comments and support!

You just never know!

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Since my very first trip here, I have had basically no idea what was going on. I mean that in a good way — God said, “Go,” so I came. Every trip since, I’ve planned out what I know I’ll be doing, but God always does something more, something unexpected and amazing. This time, I had two unplanned/unknown things to do: visiting Hospice Tororo, and meeting up with Pastor Samuel Namatiiti, with whom I was connected via a Twitter-only friend. I’ve blogged already about going to Tororo, and it was great to reconnect with Rinty there. I hope we can begin to help Hospice Tororo in the future, and I know I’ve cemented a friendship.

Today, though, was pretty amazing. Sam asked me to come to his church to meet, which is on the way back to Father’s House from town, on Entebbe Road. Life Church has been around for nearly 50 years, and he’s a founding pastor there. It turns out he’s “retired” but he’s super busy, translating books into Luganda for missionaries, and writing his own books.

Anyway, I arrived and we chatted for about 40 minutes before he showed me a fat book, which turned out to be his translation of the New Testament, Proverbs and Psalms into modern Luganda. I said I’d love a copy for my son when he got it published, at which time he started telling me the difficulties in that… After listening for a few minutes, I said, “I can publish it for you in the States,” and proceded to tell him about CreateSpace and all the things I’ve been doing since last summer publishing (never mind that I actually have a publishing company!). Where we left it was that he is going to mail me a digital copy of the Bible (email is so slow that a large file often gets corrupted) and I’m going to work with my graphic designer and formatter and try to get it published in the next few months!

So… how about that? You meet a new friend and end up publishing a Bible… Yep, you just never know!

POSTSCRIPT: It’s 11:30 at night and I have been overwhelmed for the last half hour with tears… I’ve spent this week in the villages. I know how those people live, and that most can’t speak English. Still, many have treasured English Bibles, or old Lugandan ones that are poorly translated. I don’t know why I’ve been given this amazing task. I am humbled and overcome.